feminist

Happy International Women's Day!

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...I had no precedent for being valued. Everything that came from a woman’s experience was considered trivial. I wasn’t sure if my work would shift that paradigm or not, but I had to try.
— artist Carolee Schneemann, 1939-2019

Nadja-Léona - Yes, we are mysterious, powerful...

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Who are you?
I am the soul in limbo.

Nadja-Léona, an activated installation performed at the Alliance Française of Melbourne. Dance with video, sound, text, architecture.

Nadja-Léona: concept and direction by Jude Walton with Finnish based performer Gesa Piper, dancers/choreographers: Michaela Pegum, Jo White, Hillary Goldsmith and Arabella Frahn-Starkie, composer/pianist Kym Dillon and artist Eliza Dyball.

Below, a few photos and thoughts after viewing the performance:
- by Catherine Schieve

After witnessing this wonderful, luminous work by Jude Walton and collaborators, I am left thinking about many aspects of dance performance that are intimately connected to the performance of ritual and worship. Here are a few jottings: The eloquence of the body in space; the ability of the body to create sacred space and to hold space; the mystery of objects and props, primal forms such as the egg; how text does and does not share meaning with gesture; how (even now!) the female form is rare as the “primary mover” in performance and worship; the beauty and humour of costume and mask; distance created by masking and ritual gestures creates space for meaning and imagination… and how architecture is enlivened by movement; how time perception is changed by witnessing human movement; and the very tangible presences of light and sound.

NOTE: These photos are only from the third, and final movement of the work. The first two movements were completely different, and occupied their own spaces; the first took place as a projection upon a dancer’s bare back. The second movement was in an underground crypt-like space and had a strong component of projected video, live music, and the texture of stone and light.

With thanks and appreciation to Jude Walton and company

Christa, Our Sister

Christa in   Emmanuel Garibay   ,  “Emmaus,” Paddington Uniting Church, Sydney.  (Photo: Stephen Burns.)   See Rod Pattenden’s article on Garibay  here .     WHO IS THE CHRISTA?   Every woman forced to have sex who didn’t want it Every girl trafficked out of her own home country trapped in some anonymous bedsit in someone else’s city working all the hours men want to have her body making a fast buck for her pimp  The woman you meet in the street with bruises all up her arm which you don’t see because she covers them up in long sleeved blouses and thick sweaters (Harder to hide the gash on her face but make-up has its uses) Every woman who is too frightened to go out alone because of what has happened to her in the past or what she imagines might happen to her  The woman sleeping in the underpass in her makeshift room of cardboard who wards off the unwanted attentions from the drunk two streets up  The smart young graduate climbing the career ladder who can’t get through the day without shooting up The anorexic teenager starving her young body that is strange to her and she cannot seem to love The classrooms of self-harming girls  The nine-year old orphan caring for three siblings all under five in a shanty town in any African city Her parents dead from AIDs  Every street girl and boy scavenging on rubbish tips Every child working in sweatshops making cheap tee-shirts for Primark All the women raped in war or, worse, forced to watch their daughters raped Husbands shot in front of their eyes  Women who walk a thousand miles through a war-zone with babies on their hips and children dragging along beside them Desperate to make it to a refugee camp where they might find food and shelter  Christa, our sister, have mercy Christa, God’s beloved, show us your face where we have not wanted to see it where we resist your presence among us.  From     Nicola Slee,  Seeking the Risen Christa      (London: SPCK, 2011).  More:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0966735012451831   More:  https://stmarkscrc.co.uk/portfolio-items/christa-the-female-christ-with-nicola-slee/

Christa in Emmanuel Garibay, “Emmaus,” Paddington Uniting Church, Sydney. (Photo: Stephen Burns.)

See Rod Pattenden’s article on Garibay here.

WHO IS THE CHRISTA?

Every woman forced to have sex who didn’t want it
Every girl trafficked out of her own home country
trapped in some anonymous bedsit in someone else’s city
working all the hours men want to have her body
making a fast buck for her pimp

The woman you meet in the street with bruises all up her arm
which you don’t see because she covers them up in long sleeved blouses
and thick sweaters
(Harder to hide the gash on her face but make-up has its uses)
Every woman who is too frightened to go out alone because of what has happened to her in the past or what she imagines might happen to her

The woman sleeping in the underpass
in her makeshift room of cardboard
who wards off the unwanted attentions from the drunk two streets up

The smart young graduate climbing the career ladder
who can’t get through the day without shooting up
The anorexic teenager starving her young body
that is strange to her and she cannot seem to love
The classrooms of self-harming girls

The nine-year old orphan caring for three siblings all under five
in a shanty town in any African city
Her parents dead from AIDs

Every street girl and boy scavenging on rubbish tips
Every child working in sweatshops making cheap tee-shirts for Primark
All the women raped in war or, worse, forced to watch their daughters raped
Husbands shot in front of their eyes

Women who walk a thousand miles through a war-zone
with babies on their hips and children dragging along beside them
Desperate to make it to a refugee camp
where they might find food and shelter

Christa, our sister,
have mercy
Christa, God’s beloved,
show us your face
where we have not wanted to see it
where we resist your presence among us.

From Nicola Slee, Seeking the Risen Christa (London: SPCK, 2011).

More: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0966735012451831

More: https://stmarkscrc.co.uk/portfolio-items/christa-the-female-christ-with-nicola-slee/